Apr 2013 30

The Twilight Garden - HopeThe Twilight Garden
Category: Synthpop / Post-Punk
Album: Hope
Stars: 4.5
Blurb: The Twilight Garden’s new LP Hope is an unforgettable post-punk masterpiece.


 

When multi-instrumentalist Todd Loomis joined EBM heavyweights Velvet Acid Christ in 2005, he helped push the group’s sound to new heights. Although his results with Velvet Acid Christ were stunningly refreshing, Loomis pressed forth and established a solo project under the moniker of The Twilight Garden, perhaps in homage of the iconic B-side from The Cure. Like the possible namesake, The Twilight Garden’s music features lush soundscapes, melancholic overtures, and delicate pop melodies. On the new album, appropriately titled Hope, Loomis pushes his songwriting abilities and pop sensibilities to great new heights.

“Falling Rain” opens the record with a slow paced and synth-laden journey. Instantly recognizable is The Twilight Garden’s predilection to gravitate towards an early ‘80s post-punk sound, made famous by bands such as The Cure and New Order. Later in the album, “Ravens and Doves” and “Violet” recall the same shades of inspiration. Any less of a songwriter would stumble when walking in the shadows of the aforementioned giants, but not Loomis. While a good portion of these songs are rooted in the past, he brings a sense of urgency and modernity to the music, making them sound nearly timeless. That being said, Hope isn’t simply a one trick pony. The harsher sound of Loomis’ past work with Velvet Acid Christ rears its head in parts of the album, most notably on “Trail of Tears” parts I and II with the first part comprised of screaming vocals and tribal drumbeats that would make Martin Atkins proud. The aggression doesn’t last for long though, and the dirge and gloom return with the sprawling masterpiece “Hope,” which features beautiful vocal melodies and a huge chorus, making it one of high points on the record. “Falling in Circles” sees The Twilight Garden serve up a slice of synthpop goodness that only gets better with each passing second. Later, in “Fixation,” Loomis’ anguished cries combine with an unstoppable dance beat, providing an interesting sonic dichotomy – your feet want to dance, but your heart feels soft with mourning; brilliant. The hauntingly beautiful “Resolve” closes the album, whose minimal and contemplative piano is sure to tug at even the most hardened of heartstrings, easily making it the perfect song to close out a nearly perfect album.

Hope will not win any accolades for originality. Many of the sounds presented on the record have been heard before. But what sets apart The Twilight Garden from the sea of imitators is the band’s capability to craft a solid and memorable song. Furthermore, the sequencing of the album is impeccable, always providing enough change to keep the listener engaged, but never staying in one sonic territory for too long. As if that weren’t enough, the album itself sounds fantastic and is fit for speakers of any size and volume. Where most other bands would falter, with Hope, Loomis rises to the occasion and presents a fantastic album full of synth-laden post-punk goodness.
 
Track list:

  1. Falling Rain
  2. Burning If We Stay
  3. Trail of Tears, Part I
  4. Hope
  5. Falling in Circles
  6. Reconcile
  7. Ravens and Doves
  8. Fixation
  9. Fire
  10. Trail of Tears, Part II
  11. Violet
  12. Resolve

 
The Twilight Garden Website http://www.thetwilightgarden.com
The Twilight Garden MySpace http://www.myspace.com/thetwilightgardenmyspace
The Twilight Garden Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thetwilightgarden
The Twilight Garden Twitter https://twitter.com/twilight_garden
Metropolis Records Website http://www.metropolis-records.com
Metropolis Records MySpace http://www.myspace.com/metropolisrecords
Metropolis Records Facebook http://www.facebook.com/MetropolisRecords
Metropolis Records Twitter http://www.twitter.com/metropolisrec
 
Purchase at:
Amazon CD
Amazon MP3
 
2012-11-27
 
Ryan Brun (RBrun)

1 Comment

  1. […] Read the full review over at Regen Magazine!!! […]

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